Neutering Scheme

Low Cost Cat Neutering 2014

Low Cost Cat Neutering 2014
Low Cost Cat Neutering 2014

The Linacre Cat Neuter Project 2013 final report

Aims
• To implement a targeted neuter program for cats in the community within the postcodes of Liverpool 20, 4, 11, 30 and Liverpool 21 an area of north Liverpool and south Sefton that is acknowledged in all government statistics to be the most deprived on Merseyside.
• To provide sufficient resources to allow reactive cat neutering where need has been proven and to allow public access to a means tested neuter program across the whole of Liverpool
• To forge meaningful links with other community groups working within the postcodes through which the scheme could be pushed
• To collect and assess data on both participating households and individual felines  to allow patterns to be assessed as well as guiding future plans
• To draw up a list of factors from the data that would act as indices to allow the charity to assess impact of the scheme within these areas to guide future programs
• To target the surplus cat population living on the streets and from where too many households seem to acquire their cats

Method
• Funding to the tune of £35,000 was obtained that it was hoped would pay for over 1000 cats to be neutered within Merseyside, including sizable numbers within the target postcodes. The charity was able to neuter 1108 cats with this sum, of which 390 fell within the Linacre target postcodes. Since the Linacre Project began 1424 cats have been neutered by our funders, the vast majority within the original single targetted deprived area of Liverpool 20 [651]. The 1108 cats neutered during 2013 include 794 household domestic cats and 312 street or feral cats

Garston rescue £3700
Freshfields rescue £5700
Cats Protection £14,680
External  vouchers £1625
Persula Foundation £5000
Southport Anim Welfare £800
Marchig Fund £2000
Animals in Need £1150
Total £34,655

• Contact was established with a large number of existing community groups through the offices of Sefton Council for Voluntary Services already working with families, debt issues, advice provision, community support and social housing providers. All were provided with an outline of the project, its funders and three channels to register cats for the project. Many chose to publish the project on their websites and we asked all community groups to ensure all their staff were aware of the opportunity
• All public service outlets were given publicity material on the project that the public could access, including libraries, social service offices, meeting rooms, churches and other animal welfare bodies like the PDSA, dog wardens and RSPCA inspectorate
• The charity ran a waiting list for the period once cats were registered, the public were encouraged to register by email, by text or by landline
• Several veterinary clinics handled all the neuters professionally with good feedback between the charity and the vets including, Withy Grove, Kirkby clinic, Vets 4 Pets Old Swan, Whitecross and the newest clinic that has signed up to the project Vets 4 Pets Walton Vale.

Kirkby clinic 449
Vets 4 pets OS 363
Withy grove 89
Whitecross 87
Vets 4 Pets WV 187

• Post surgery problems for all the clinics were minimal in what can be a challenging situation where cat recovery in often chaotic households could be expected to be difficult. Very little veterinary intervention was required after surgery. The project is indebted to the work, professionalism and flexibility of all the clinics in accommodating the Project.
• As with previous years no neutering vouchers were issued direct to households or clinics. Over 80% of the 1108 cats were collected from households, taken to clinic by the Project and returned with veterinary instructions by staff to ensure neutering was carried out. Previous attempts to issue vouchers and allow households to make the arrangements themselves have been met with failure rates of 25% and more, leaving unclaimed vouchers. Increasingly the charity has where appropriate endeavoured to meet household owners at the clinic on the morning of surgery to complete paperwork and hand over to the nurses but non attendance is significantly higher than morning pick-ups where owners fail to answer the door

Findings

• The 2013 neuter figures included the following Linacre targeted postcode figures which amounted to 35% of the Merseyside figures. Significantly the L20 figures are down for the fourth year, from 13%. When the Project was started it was 17% of the total annual neuter numbers conducted by the Project. Take up from the Linacre postcodes across the board was down, reflecting the increase in reactive neutering across the city in other postcodes. Increasingly many of the clinics across the city are signposting the public to the project when they deem a genuine need.

L11;2012 97 8% L11; 2013 42 3.8%
L20;2012 159 13% L20; 2013 115 10.4%
L21;2012 114 9.4% L21; 2013 67 6%
L4;2012 192 15.8% L4; 2013 136 12.3%
L30;2012 96 8% L30; 2013 30 2.7%

• The charity has drawn up an 8 point impact plan to measure and assess how effective this scheme on the ground will be. It argues that over a number of years assessment of its collated data will show reductions in age, male-female ratio, litters produced, percentage of pregnant cats etc. The charity has identified these key 8 areas of impact;

• Male ; female ratio
• Age at neuter by gender
• Percentage of female pregnant or in season
• Percentage of dysfunctional households
• Percentage of females already had litters at point of neuter
• Average number of litters per females done by postcode
• Percentage owned cats neutered ; percentage street cats neutered by postcode
• Percentage cats neutered living in multicat households

  Male ; female ratio
Merseyside 2012 M = 45.4% F = 54.6% Merseyside 2013 M = 42.5% F = 57.5%
Liverpool 20 M = 44.6% F = 55.4% Liverpool 20 M = 34% F = 66%
Liverpool 21 M = 55.2% F = 44.8% Liverpool 21 M = 37% F = 63%
Liverpool 30 M = 52% F = 48% Liverpool 30 M = 40% F = 60%
Liverpool 11 M = 49.4% F = 49.6% Liverpool 11 M = 45% F = 55%
Liverpool 4 M = 40% F = 60% Liverpool 4 M = 47%  F = 53%

• Resistance to male neutering in both cats and dogs from male household members is notably strong. To measure impact over a number of years a decline in the need for female neutering should be observable

B  Age at neuter by gender

Rehoming cats 2012 M = 0.8 F = 0.87 Rehoming cats 2013 M = 0.8 F = 0.87
Merseyside average M = 1.33 F = 1.33 Merseyside average M = 1.5 F = 1.6
Liverpool 20 M = 1.04 F = 1.36 Liverpool 20 M = 1.3 F = 1.04
Liverpool 21 M = 1.5 F = 1.55 Liverpool 21 M = 1.28 F = 1.2
Liverpool 30 M = 1.68 F = 1.33 Liverpool 30 M = 0.6 F = 1.5
Liverpool 11 M = 1.14 F = 1.1 Liverpool 11 M = 1.7 F = 2
Liverpool 4 M = 1.14 F = 1.42 Liverpool 4 M = 1.33 F = 1.25

• The project works towards an early age of neutering. For most females that are unneutered by the age of 1.3, a pregnancy is unavoidable. For the first year since Linacre started in 2009 female age at neuter  in L20 has dropped; the charity aims to neuter before its first season.

C    Percentage of females pregnant or in season at neuter

Merseyside average 2012 18.8% Merseyside average 2013 19.4%
Liverpool 20 18.2% Liverpool 20 17%
Liverpool 21 27.4% Liverpool 21 28%
Liverpool 30 32.6% Liverpool 30 16%
Liverpool 11 4% Liverpool 11 26%
Liverpool 4 23.4% Liverpool 4 24%

• A reduction in these high figures needs to be essential in reducing feline overpopulation. The figure for Liverpool 20 has dropped from 28.4% to 17%. The figure for Liverpool 11 of 4% stands out suggesting an absence of older unneutered female cats or that the project has not reached the audience it should be addressing.

D    Percentage of cats from dysfunctional houses

Merseyside average 2012 7.6% Merseyside average 2013 9%
Liverpool 20 4.4% Liverpool 20 2.6%
Liverpool 21 12.2% Liverpool 21 2.8
Liverpool 30 17.9% Liverpool 30 16%
Liverpool 11 0 Liverpool 11 0
Liverpool 4 3.6% Liverpool 4 2.9%

• Dysfunctional here indicates problems with alcohol, drugs and/or hygiene. Often these houses are multi-cat and quite chaotic houses generally with multi-agency needs. Accessing them and gaining co-operation can be challenging. The charity works on the principle of leaving the adult cats in what is often a poor environment but which will reduce the likelihood of acquiring further animals and then breeding again. Post neuter visits have affirmed this to be the case in most circumstances. Liverpool 20 figures have dropped from 11.1% during the last three years. Again the figure for Liverpool 11 stands out. The higher Merseyside average than most Linacre postcodes does suggest that targeted neutering has already pinpointed many of these properties


    Percentage of females already had litter at point of neuter
Average number of litters per females done

Merseyside average 2012 35.4% 0.65 Merseyside average 2013 38.2% 0.8
Liverpool 20 30.6% 1.29 Liverpool 20 22.6% 0.4
Liverpool 21 54.9% 0.84 Liverpool 21 23.3% 0.6
Liverpool 30 34.8% 0.62 Liverpool 30 22.2% 0.4
Liverpool 11 28.5% 0.6 Liverpool 11 30.4% 0.47
Liverpool 4 54.7% 0.66 Liverpool 4 30.9% 0.53

• Ideally both of these figures should register low numbers and percentages. Liverpool 20 has dropped from 40.7% three years ago and an average numbers of litters per female dropped from 1.9 to 0.4. Both results confirm reduced breeding rates in these wards and together with some of the other data here suggestive of project impact
 
      F    Percentage owned cats neutered; percentage street cats neutered

Merseyside av
2012 Owned 75% Street 25% Merseyside av
2012 Owned 72% Street 28%
Liverpool 20 Owned 85.6% Street 14.4% Liverpool 20 Owned 84.4% Street 15.6%
Liverpool 21 Owned 91% Street 9% Liverpool 21 Owned 80.6% Street 19.4%
Liverpool 30 Owned 68.6% Street 31.4% Liverpool 30 Owned 77% Street 23%
Liverpool 11 Owned 82.5% Street 17.5% Liverpool 11 Owned 93% Street 7%
Liverpool 4 Owned 80% Street 20% Liverpool 4 Owned 85.3% Street 14.7%

• Initial data collection in previous years proved that in Liverpool 20 over 32% of households got their cat from the street. The Project was surprised by this finding but targeted street cats and feral cats for that reason. This figure is substantially less now but did slightly increase this year. It is widely accepted by welfare professionals that Liverpool has a huge feral cat problem that is tackled with too few resources. A consequence of this is the larger unneutered household cat numbers derived from the street. Tackling overbreeding in a given area has firstly to tackle the number on the streets. It should be noted here that if the street cats are added to the house cats whose owners tell us that they got them off the street in the first place then the Merseyside figure of 28% becomes 35%. In other words 35% of the public this Project helped only acquired their cats because the animals were ownerless or feral and needed intervention to provide food, shelter and/or a home.

G    Percentage of cats from households owning over three cats

Merseyside average 2012 52% Merseyside average 2013 59%
Liverpool 20 48.4% Liverpool 20 44.3%
Liverpool 21 37.7% Liverpool 21 49.2%
Liverpool 30 70% Liverpool 30 43%
Liverpool 11 43.2% Liverpool 11 54.7%
Liverpool 4 52% Liverpool 4 53.1%

• This surprising figure ignores logic in a deprived area where resources are tight. Not neutering means a household ends up with several generations of cats. Neutered cat households stay at the normal one or two cats. Because households lack guidance, advice or direct access to a scheme, the problem multiplies. The Liverpool 20 figure has risen from 37% from three years ago; the project is aware that the offer of cheap or free neutering can be regarded as an incentive to collect too many cats

• It cannot be stressed how surprising the charity found the almost complete lack of existing contact households in the target areas had with other animal health professionals. Only 16 cats of the 1108 came from a welfare charity. Only six households had cat flaps installed. Only 5.9% of the total had already vaccinated their cats. Only 6.7% had registered their cat to a private practice. Another 5.5% of cats were registered to the pdsa clinics in the city. Twelve had previously chipped their cats. Any regard to these figures must conclude that well over 90% of the households worked with had no prior access to advice, guidance and experience from welfare professionals

H Where were cats acquired from?

Area  2012 Bred Family/friend Street Pet shop
Merseyside average 23% 25% 29.5% 7%
Liverpool 20 15.6% 40.2% 23.8% 10.4%
Liverpool 21 22.7% 35.2% 22.7% 4%
Liverpool 30 34.8% 22.4% 31.4% 0
Liverpool 11 16.4% 31.7% 22.3% 14.1%
Liverpool 4 18.3% 21.9% 31.7% 15.2%
Merseyside 2013 21.5% 19.1% 35% 6.4%
Liverpool 20 7.8% 32.1% 26% 8.6%
Liverpool 21 11.9% 31.2% 40% 4.4%
Liverpool 30 33% 19% 23% 0
Liverpool 11 19% 19% 26% 7%
Liverpool 4 14.7% 23.3% 27% 15.4%

• If the project does not know where cats are acquired from it cannot tackle root causes. Access to the Project allows guidance to a social grouping where it is self evident there has been no access to welfare professionals previously. Breeding within the household can be tackled by the Project’s doorstep approach. Its street work can and will reduce the availability of young cats to households that never really wanted a cat in the first place. It should be stressed that a large number of these street derived cats simply arrived on a doorstep, feeding by the household commenced and the cat moved in. Family and friend derived cats will always be a factor but it is important to stress that this is the predominant medium along with the word and praise of neighbours by which the Project has spread its message and enabled its work to progress on difficult estates. Working with the community has been integral to its success

Conclusions

 The charity commenced an intensive blanket neuter program within the postcode of Liverpool 20, with the assistance of external funders and working on the ground with voluntary and professional community agencies in 2009. It has taken its method of working and now applied it to other deprived north Liverpool areas
 Its modus operandi has proved to be essential. All the data indicates a clear lack of advice, guidance, contact of any kind with vet health professionals. Only the pdsa operate on the ground, there are no private vet clinics in either Liverpool 20, Liverpool 30, Liverpool 21 or Liverpool 11 and only one clinic in Liverpool 4. There is clear evidence that whole communities are by passed unwittingly until a project like this is taken into the community as a whole. Not surprisingly the community then responds positively
 It is indeed unfortunate that where social deprivation is so endemic, cat neutering is at the bottom of the heap. There is no way round this other than to make provision for it. The charity has always believed that animal ownership should be universal, but there needs to be provision and support
 It is clear that because there has been too little intervention by the third sector [this charity has been working on the ground within L20 well before 2009 but with too little resourcing] there are too many felines within the postcodes. The excessive breeding supplies households within the community, the street’s excess further adds to household pet ownership, in all of this there is never the opportunity to encounter a structured pet adopting entity like the RSPCA or Cats Protection shelter outside the postcode and then be guided, to have input into the needs of cat ownership. The community as a whole knows little else but to continue the cycle of breeding. Supply within the community has outstripped demand. Intervention like this is crucial to breaking that cycle for the future
 The data collated from L20 over the years on over 650 cats and households in such a small geographical area is starting to suggest the beginnings of impact. By looking at key figures and trends from the above tables this charity can start to show measurable change. That these trends need to be replicated over the next couple of years is self- evident and without that proof it would be difficult to be absolutely clear about impact within the postcode of Liverpool 20
 That the project must continue on the ground over a number of years is clear. The Project envisages at least another five years of working in this way with these communities. It is important that the data is analysed comprehensively annually to guide prioritiesIt is crucial that the charity continues to collate data that can be analysed annually to guide its approach
 It is proposed that the Project no longer targets households in L11 or L30. This does not mean that the charity will not pursue reactive neutering within these areas if asked to do so but it feels that these resources should be taken up more positively than they have over the last two years and therefore proposes to pursue targeted neutering within Liverpool 6 and Liverpool 5. This will of course be carefully monitored in 2014
 Lastly the charity is pleased that a similar project is due to start in 2014 adopting the procedures and protocol established by Linacre. Animals in Need and Cats Protection will be running the Kirkby Cat Neuter Project with separate funding but with assistance from Freshfields in delivering it. This Project will bring targeted neutering to East Liverpool

Acknowledgements

None of this work would have started without the patient support of all our funders; Cats Protection, Garston Cat Rescue, Persula Foundation, Jean Marchig Fund and Southport animal welfare group. Nor would it have progressed without the keenness and generosity of the private vet clinics who have agreed to reduce their prices to do this work; Whitecross vets, Megan and Rachel’s team at Vets 4 Pets Old Swan, Michael and Mandy’s team at Withy Grove clinic, Catherine’s team at the  Kirkby vet clinic and David and Sara’s team at Vets 4 Pets Walton Vale. Thanks to you all

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


2013 Assisted Cat Neuter Project Details.

2013 Assisted Cat Neuter Project Details.
2013 Assisted Cat Neuter Project Details.

The Linacre Cats Protection Project 2011 - 2012 final report

 Aims

  • To implement an intensive, on the ground neuter program for cats in the community within the postcodes of Liverpool 20, 4, 11, 30 and Liverpool 21 an area of north Liverpool and south Sefton that is acknowledged in all government statistics to be the most deprived on Merseyside.
  • To forge meaningful links with other community groups working within the postcodes through which the scheme could be pushed
  • To collect and assess data on both participating households and individual felines  to allow patterns to be assessed as well as guiding future plans
  • To draw up a list of factors from the data that would act as indices to allow the charity to assess impact of the scheme within these areas to guide future programs

Methods

  • Funding to the tune of £38,966 was obtained that it was hoped would pay for over 1000 cats to be neutered within Merseyside, including sizable numbers within the target postcodes. The charity was able to neuter 1212 cats with this sum, of which 658 fell within the Linacre target postcodes. Since the Linacre Project began 1034 cats have been neutered by our funders, the vast majority within the original deprived area of Liverpool 20 [536]. The 1212 cats neutered during 2012 include 908 household domestic cats and 304 street or feral cats 

 

Garston rescue

£2443.24

Freshfields rescue

£4264.16

Cats Protection

£25,513.12

External CP vouchers

£246

Persula Foundation

£5000

Southport Anim Welfare

£500

Marchig Fund

£1000

Total

£38,966

 

  • Contact was established with a large number of existing community groups through the offices of Sefton Council for Voluntary Services already working with families, debt issues, advice provision, community support and social housing providers. All were provided with an outline of the project, its funders and three channels to register cats for the project. Many chose to publish the project on their websites and we asked all community groups to ensure all their staff were aware of the opportunity
  • All public service outlets were given publicity material on the project that the public could access, including libraries, social service offices, meeting rooms, churches and other animal welfare bodies like the PDSA, dog wardens and RSPCA inspectorate
  • The charity ran a waiting list for the period once cats were registered, starting the first neuters from 6/10/11 and only finishing on  31/12/12
  • Several veterinary clinics handled all the neuters professionally with good feedback between the charity and the vets including Hillcrest, Withy Grove, Kirkby clinic. Just Cats, Vets 4 Pets, Whitecross. A total of 75% of this workload was taken up by four of these clinics

 

 

Kirkby clinic

151

Vets 4 pets

348

Withy grove

255

Whitecross

188

 

  • Post surgery problems for all the clinics was minimal in what can be a challenging situation where cat recovery in often chaotic households could be expected to be difficult. Three of the clinics Whitecross under Lizzie Goldstraw, Just Cats under Simon Backshaw and the Kirkby clinic under Catherine Gurka achieved a problem free run this year with no restitching needed. The project is indebted to the work, professionalism and flexibility of all the clinics in accommodating the Project.
  • As with previous years no neutering vouchers were issued direct to households or clinics. Over 90% of the 1212 cats were collected from households, taken to clinic by the Project and returned with veterinary instructions by staff to ensure neutering was carried out. Previous attempts to issue vouchers and allow households to make the arrangements themselves have been met with failure rates of 25% and more, leaving unclaimed vouchers

Findings

 

  • The 2012 neuter figures included the following Linacre target postcode figures which amounted to 54% of the Merseyside figures. Significantly the L20 figures are down for the third year, from 14.3%. When the Project was started it was 17% of the total. All the other postcodes are up.

 

 

L11

97

8%

L20

159

13%

L21

114

9.4%

L4

192

15.8%

L30

96

8%

 

  • The charity has drawn up a 9 point impact plan to measure and assess how effective this scheme on the ground will be. It argues that over a number of years assessment of its collated data will show reductions in age, male-female ratio, litters produced, percentage of pregnant cats etc. The charity has identified these key 9 areas of impact;

 

  • Male ; female ratio
  • Age at neuter by gender
  • Percentage of female pregnant or in season
  • Percentage of dysfunctional households
  • Kitten litters admitted to rescue by postcode
  • Percentage of females already had litters at point of neuter
  • Average number of litters per females done by postcode
  • Percentage owned cats neutered ; percentage street cats neutered by postcode
  • Percentage cats neutered living in multicat households

 

  1. Male ; female ratio

 

Merseyside average

M = 45.4%

F = 54.6%

Liverpool 20

M = 44.6%

F = 55.4%

Liverpool 21

M = 55.2%

F = 44.8%

Liverpool 30

M = 52%

F = 48%

Liverpool 11

M = 49.4%

F = 49.6%

Liverpool 4

M = 40%

F = 60%

 

  • Resistance to male neutering in both cats and dogs from male household members is notably strong. To measure impact over a number of years a decline in the need for female neutering should be observable. The male percentage for L20 has declined from 56.2% since last year

 

B    Male ; female ratio

 

 

Rehoming cats

M = 0.8

F = 0.87

Merseyside average

M = 1.33

F = 1.33

Liverpool 20

M = 1.04

F = 1.36

Liverpool 21

M = 1.5

F = 1.55

Liverpool 30

M = 1.68

F = 1.33

Liverpool 11

M = 1.14

F = 1.1

Liverpool 4

M = 1.14

F = 1.42

 

  • The project works towards an early age of neutering. For most females that are unneutered by the age of 1.3, a pregnancy is unavoidable. There has been no drop in female age at neuter since the project began in L20 but the male age has decreased from 1.5

 C    Percentage of females pregnant or in season at neuter

 

 

Merseyside average

18.8%

Liverpool 20

18.2%

Liverpool 21

27.4%

Liverpool 30

32.6%

Liverpool 11

4%

Liverpool 4

23.4%

 

  • A reduction in these high figures needs to be essential in reducing feline overpopulation. The figure for Liverpool 20 has dropped from 28.4% to 18.2%. The figure for Liverpool 11 of 4% stands out suggesting an absence of older unneutered female cats or that the project has not reached the audience it should be addressing.

D    Percentage of cats from dysfunctional houses

 

 

Merseyside average

7.6%

Liverpool 20

4.4%

Liverpool 21

12.2%

Liverpool 30

17.9%

Liverpool 11

0

Liverpool 4

3.6%

 

  • Dysfunctional here indicates problems with alcohol, drugs and/or hygiene. Often these houses are multi-cat and quite chaotic houses generally with multi-agency needs. Accessing them and gaining co-operation can be challenging. The charity works on the principle of leaving the adult cats in what is often a poor environment but which will reduce the likelihood of acquiring further animals and then breeding again. Post neuter visits have affirmed this to be the case in most circumstances. Liverpool 20 figures have dropped from 11.1% last year. Again the figure for Liverpool 11 stands out

 

E    Litters admitted to the charity by postcode

 

 

Liverpool 20

n/a

Liverpool 21

n/a

Liverpool 30

9.8%

Liverpool 11

4.4%

Liverpool 4

n/a

 

  • Unfortunately the data collected was too vague for follow-up assessment

 

F     Percentage of females already had litter at point of neuter

Average number of litters per females done

 

 

Merseyside average

35.4%

0.65

Liverpool 20

30.6%

1.29

Liverpool 21

54.9%

0.84

Liverpool 30

34.8%

0.62

Liverpool 11

28.5%

0.6

Liverpool 4

54.7%

0.66

 

  • Ideally both of these figures should register low numbers and percentages. Liverpool 20 has dropped from 40.7% to 30.6% and an average numbers of litters per females dropped from 1.9 to 1.29. Both results confirm reduced breeding rates in these wards

 

      G    Percentage owned cats neutered; percentage street cats neutered

 

 

Merseyside average

Owned 75%

Street 25%

Liverpool 20

Owned 85.6%

Street 14.4%

Liverpool 21

Owned 91%

Street 9%

Liverpool 30

Owned 68.6%

Street 31.4%

Liverpool 11

Owned 82.5%

Street 17.5%

Liverpool 4

Owned 80%

Street 20%

 

  • Initial data collection in previous years proved that in Liverpool 20 over 32% of households got their cat from the street. The Project was surprised by this finding but targeted street cats and feral cats for that reason. This figure has now dropped to 14.4%. It is widely accepted by welfare professionals that Liverpool has a huge feral cat problem that is tackled with too few resources. A consequence of this is the larger unneutered household cat numbers derived from the street. Tackling overbreeding in a given area has firstly to tackle the number on the streets

 

H    Percentage of cats from households owning over three cats

 

 

Merseyside average

52%

Liverpool 20

48.4%

Liverpool 21

37.7%

Liverpool 30

70%

Liverpool 11

43.2%

Liverpool 4

52%

 

  • This surprising figure ignores logic in a deprived area where resources are tight. Not neutering means a household ends up with several generations of cats. Neutered cat households stay at the normal one or two cats. Because households lack guidance, advice or direct access to a scheme, the problem multiplies. The Liverpool 20 figure has risen from 37% last year

 

I     Percentage of adult cats admitted to the charity that were unneutered

 

 

Liverpool 20

10%

Liverpool 21

10%

Liverpool 30

5.7%

Liverpool 11

2.8%

Liverpool 4

11.4%

 

  • The figure for Liverpool 20 has fallen from its 2009 figure of 14.5%. The Project started in the first place to try and reduce the constant need to tackle cat issues on the same estates over and over again
  • It cannot be stressed how surprising the charity found the almost complete lack of existing contact households in the target areas had with other animal health professionals. Only one cat of the 1212 came from a welfare charity. Only five households had cat flaps installed. Only 6.5% of the total had already vaccinated their cats. Only 4% had registered their cat to a private practice. Another 9.4% of cats were registered to the pdsa clinics in the city. Any regard to these figures must conclude that well over 90% of the households worked with had no prior access to advice, guidance and experience from welfare professionals

 

Where were cats acquired from?

 

 

Area

Bred

Family/friend

Street

Pet shop

Merseyside average

23%

25%

29.5%

7%

Liverpool 20

15.6%

40.2%

23.8%

10.4%

Liverpool 21

22.7%

35.2%

22.7%

4%

Liverpool 30

34.8%

22.4%

31.4%

0

Liverpool 11

16.4%

31.7%

22.3%

14.1%

Liverpool 4

18.3%

21.9%

31.7%

15.2%

 

  • If the project does not know where cats are acquired from it cannot tackle root causes. Access to the Project allows guidance to a social grouping where it is self evident there has been no access to welfare professionals previously. Breeding within the household can be tackled by the Project’s doorstep approach. Its street work can and will reduce the availability of young cats to households that never really wanted a cat in the first place. It should be stressed that a large number of these street derived cats simply arrived on a doorstep, feeding by the household commenced and the cat moved in. Family and friend derived cats will always be a factor but it is important to stress that this is the predominant medium along with the word and praise of neighbours by which the Project has spread its message and enabled its work to progress on difficult estates. Working with the community has been integral to its success

 

Conclusions

 

  • The charity commenced an intensive blanket neuter program within the postcode of Liverpool 20, with the assistance of external funders and working on the ground with voluntary and professional community agencies three years ago. It has taken its method of working and now applied it to other deprived north Liverpool areas
  • Its modus operandi has proved to be essential. All the data indicates a clear lack of advice, guidance, contact of any kind with vet health professionals. Only the pdsa operate on the ground, there are no private vet clinics in either Liverpool 20, Liverpool 30, Liverpool 21 or Liverpool 11 and only one clinic in Liverpool 4. There is clear evidence that whole communities are by passed unwittingly until a project like this is taken into the community as a whole. Not surprisingly the community then responds positively
  • It is indeed unfortunate that where social deprivation is so endemic, cat neutering is at the bottom of the heap. There is no way round this other than to make provision for it. The charity has always believed that animal ownership should be universal, but there needs to be provision and support
  • It is clear that because there has been too little intervention by the third sector [this charity has been working on the ground within L20 for 5 years but with too little resourcing] there are too many felines within the postcodes. The excessive breeding supplies households within the community, the street’s excess further adds to household pet ownership, in all of this there is never the opportunity to encounter a structured pet adopting entity like the RSPCA or Cats Protection shelter outside the postcode and then be guided, to have input into the needs of cat ownership. The community as a whole knows little else but to continue the cycle of breeding. Supply within the community has outstripped demand. Intervention like this is crucial to breaking that cycle for the future
  • That the project must continue on the ground over a number of years is clear. The Project envisages at least another five years of working in this way with these communities. It is important that the data is analysed comprehensively annually to guide priorities. The first years’ data for Liverpool 11 suggests that the cat problems there are of a less serious nature than first observed. This can be reassessed next year
  • It is crucial that the charity continues to collate data that can be analysed annually to guide its approach

Acknowledgements

 

None of this work would have started without the patient support of all our funders; Cats Protection, Garston Cat Rescue, Persula Foundation, Jean Marchig Fund and Southport animal welfare group. Nor would it have progressed without the keenness and generosity of the private vet clinics who have agreed to reduce their prices to do this work; Whitecross vets, Vets 4 Pets, Just Cats, Withy Grove clinic, Kirkby clinic and Hillcrest. Thanks to you all

 

 


2012 Subsidised Neutering Scheme on Merseyside

2012 Subsidised Neutering Scheme on Merseyside

Freshfields Animal Rescue is offering the cheapest cat neutering in Liverpool!!!

Asking for a voluntary contribution of only £10 for male cats and £15 for females it is only open to low income households in Liverpool, Knowsley and Sefton

Please note - for multi cat households additional help is available! Please do not be put off by the £10/£15 fee just contact us with full information regarding ALL of the cats in your household and we will create a plan that works for ALL of us!

In 2012 the charity is concentrating on the following postcodes and will prioritise households in these areas;

Liverpool 4, 8, 11, 20, 21 & 30

Households living outside these postcodes will be eligible but may have a longer wait. Currently there is a 4 week waiting time. The charity manages about 25 a week

To register your cats for the project, give us your name, address, phone numbers [2 please], postcode and sex of your cats in one of the following ways:
By phone 0151 931 1604 [9 to 5pm]
By text 07789624517
By email cattery@freshfieldsrescue.org.uk


Cats Protection Assisted Neuter Program 2011- Annual Report

Freshfields Animal Rescue neutered 1351 cats during 2011

Rehoming cats

111

Feral cats

417

Household cats

823

In line with Cats Protection policy, the charity has phased out its reliance on the national charity to subsidise its cost of neutering cats formally admitted to us for rehoming [269 were neutered in 2010]. Both the feral cat colony trap, neuter and release numbers for 2010 [364] and the household door to door neuters for low income households for 2010 [413] were increased substantially. In 2011, the rehoming unit of the cattery at Freshfields admitted 554 cats and kittens that were unwanted [499 in 2010] and successfully placed 502 in permanent homes [503 in 2010]

The charity worked well with 5 clinics in the north-west as follows. Their respective totals were;

Rufford

352

Justcats

204

Vets4pets, old swan

193

Hillcrest

212

Withy grove

309

Others

81

All our main 5 clinics have now adopted intradermal stitching with female spays resulting in far fewer post surgery complications where owned cats returned to their household then go on to remove the stitching usually within the first 24 hours, despite buster collaring. This is reflected in the very low post op complication ratio of 1:160. It has also meant a saving to the charity both in expensive emergency treatment and little need for purchasing buster collars. Congratulations to Megan Brannigan and Rachel Hughes, practice partner and head vet nurse respectively at vets4pets  www.vets4pets.com who achieved a completely clear run with no post surgery difficulties.

In 2011 the first phase of the Linacre Project was completed in September where 376 cats from households within Liverpool 20 were neutered for low income households. Very much a pilot project, the charity has started its second phase of the project with external funding from the Persula Foundation and Jean Marchig Fund and been able to extend its modus operandi from Liverpool 20 to other areas of Liverpool. Another 98 cats have already been neutered for this second phase of the Linacre Project . Because the charity has for over 3 years now been extensively working on the ground within Liverpool 20 and building a rapport with other community bodies already established in the area, it has developed a growing database of information on households and cat ownership that it is increasingly able to use to assess strategies, impact, effectiveness and need. It has also made the charity realise that for a program to be truly effective a 5 year plan is essential

Essentially however the charity has drawn up a 9 point impact plan to measure and assess how effective this scheme on the ground will be. It argues that over a number of years assessment of its collated data will show reductions in age, male-female ratio, litters produced, percentage of pregnants etc. The charity has identified these key 9 areas of impact;

  • Ø Male ; female ratio
  • Ø Age at neuter by gender
  • Ø Percentage of female pregnant or in season
  • Ø Percentage of dysfunctional households
  • Ø Kitten litters admitted to rescue by postcode
  • Ø Percentage of females already had litters at point of neuter
  • Ø Average number of litters per females done by postcode
  • Ø Percentage owned cats neutered ; percentage street cats neutered by postcode
  • Ø Percentage cats neutered living in multicat households

So for instance, just using its Liverpool 20 data, the number of unneutered cats admitted to the shelter from this one postcode has declined as follows

2009

13.7%

2010

15.5%

2011

9.7%

The number of kittens admitted to the shelter from the one postcode has declined as follows

2009

15.9%

2010

11.3%

2011

10.4%

Assessing the data more generally, 3.7% of the cats neutered were direct referrals from other agencies like health visitors, social workers, child support workers and housing officers. The charity wishes to build on this figure for 2012. Households with clear issues of alcohol, drugs and serious hygiene situations, we classified as dysfunctional and accounted for 16.6% [188 cats] of the work we did. Only 37.7% of the total cats  done under the project were male reflecting the unwillingness of usually male members of the household to allow their male cats to be sterilised, preferring instead to put up with the stink of male cats at home. 12.4% of the females spayed were already pregnant and had to be aborted [104 cats]. Cumulatively the 841 female cats participating in the scheme had already had 337 litters. 66% of all the cats had to be collected and delivered back to their household. Only 26.7% possessed their own secure cat carrier. Average age at neuter for the males was 1.4 years, and females 1.46 years. 62% of the cats were from households owning 3 or more cats. Cats by postcode were neutered as below

L11

40

2.9%

L20

193

14.3%

L21

60

4.4%

L32/33

67

4.9%

L4

125

9.2%

L8

98

7.2%

PR8/PR9

42

3.1%

Despite the heavy involvement within Liverpool 20 over the last 3 years, the 14.3% figure is only marginally down from the 17% figure in 2009

Financially the following organisation have contributed to the direct cost of neutering in 2011

Garston rescue

£2021.94

Freshfields rescue

£4271.67

Cats Protection

£22638.38

Jea n Sainsbury Trust

£979.65

Persula Foundation

£7817

In addition Freshfields have met all the extra costs involved in these projects, like wage bill, ambulance costs, deflea needs, wormers [£1172.08 alone], overnight accommodation needs etc. These totalled £21,536. Finally Freshfields needs to acknowledge firstly the support of those bodies who have contributed externally to allow the charity to carry on its vital fieldwork in Liverpool and secondly the clinics that have carried out the work at discounted rates and put up with burdens this work has sometimes placed on their own essential work for their practice. We are grateful

David Callender

 


Linacre Project Year End Report

The 2010/2011 year end report for the Linacre Project Cat Neuter Scheme is out now and available to download (see below).  The report has gathered some interesting statistical information and aided Freshfields in seeing a clear path forward for the project to the end of 2012 as minimum.


2010 - Assisted Cat Neuter Report (Latest Update)

Figures for the year were as follows for the Liverpool shelter;

Adoptions 503 [2009 524]
Admits 499 [2009 529]
Rehoming neuters 269[ 2009 261]
Ferals trapped and neutered 364 [2009 299]
Door to door domestics left in the home 413 [2009 282]
Linacre L20 project [independently funded] 157
Total for 2010 1282 [2009 832]

As can be seen there was a substantial rise in the level of door to door domestic work the charity undertook solely because Cats Protection raised their level of voucher funding, this is predicted to rise further as long as the budget from CP remains roughly constant.

The charity has increased the number of clinics it now uses on Merseyside to 5 to cope with the rise in work, http://www.ruffordvets.com are handling all the Liverpool 20 project cats, http://www.justcats.co.uk mainly handle all the charity rehoming work, http://www.withygrovevets.co.uk focus on our feral work and 2 new additions http://www.vets4pets.com in Old Swan and http://www.hillcrestanimalhospital.co.uk have joined to tackle our domestic door to door workload. We have negotiated set prices for all our neuter work with each practice to cap it at £30. Over 80% of households have their cats picked up by the scheme to ensure the surgery takes place. Although increasing the cost of the scheme to this charity, this practice is a necessity to guarantee an end to breeding there, because so many of the households we are dealing with are dysfunctional.

The pilot project in Liverpool 20 [Linacre] funded by Jean Sainsbury, Jean Marchig and the Persula Foundation progresses well. Regarded as the most deprived area in north Liverpool it previously had eaten up over 17% of our CP budget in 2009 and has seen the charity working very closely with many existing community groups on the ground within the wards referring problems onto Freshfields. One of the strongest results of this collaboration has been the response of several social housing providers who have seized the initiative, published the neuter scheme in their own magazines and put the info onto their own websites. This has led to literally a deluge of requests to access the scheme, currently putting through on average 30 to 40 cats a week, still leaving a waiting list of approx 10 weeks at any one time

In a breakdown of postcodes that are and have accessed the scheme it is clear that the ripple effect of the advertising done for the Linacre Project within the various community groups and by the social housing providers has spilled over into other postcodes where tenants have seized the opportunity our work has offered. For instance in Liverpool 11 numbers have jumped from 1 to 54, Liverpool 21 33 to 84, Southport [PR8 and PR9] 38 to 64 from 2009 to 2010. Because we have been active within Liverpool 20 before the new project came on line in August the figure there has jumped from 123 to 205, 2009 to 2010

The preparation done to launch the scheme in Liverpool 20 as well as the need to satisfy the funders meant an appraisal of our modus operandi, how we keep track of the various budgets, what info we needed to gather from households so we could assess future need for the project and how we process that material. This has led to an increase in the admin work the neutering schemes have generated but to allow us to gauge accurately where and how these schemes need to be pushed we have had to computerize the info we are gathering. All of these could be relevant in future decision making on project direction; post surgery problems, number/type of agency referrals to the charity, number of dysfunctional houses dealt with, numbers in season/pregnant/litters had, households without own carrier/transport etc. This will allow us to report more extensively on the issues that Merseyside faces and as a charity with limited means reliant on grant assistance for this field work to focus on areas that the evidence proves we need to act.

Funding is reasonably secure for 2011 allowing us to further develop our community work across Merseyside, the Linacre Project work in Liverpool 20 will continue to the end of the summer. The feral colony work across the county will be substantial leading up to the spring before breeding starts again. The door to door domestic neutering for households on benefits and in social housing is set to increase even further. The charity regards this preventative work as essential and is keen for supporters to subsidize the charity's commitment to it.

 


Linacre Cat Neutering Project

Linacre Cat Neutering Project

Freshfields Animal Rescue Liverpool formed a partnership with the Persula Foundation, Jean Sainsbury Trust and the Jean Marchig Trust in 2010 allowing for the sterilisation of 400 cats within the two wards of Linacre and Derby in Liverpool 20, Sefton for families on low income.

The scheme has worked door to door as well as through the effective offices and channels of existing community groups on the ground in Linacre to maximise awareness and take up of the scheme.
The scheme started on 1st Aug 2010, literature was prepared and Community post teams were responsible for delivery door to door throughout the area. Meetings with community groups, social housing organisations and local groups within Liverpool 20, to assist with the promotion of the scheme, were held throughout July in order to aid the effective channelling of the project throughout those wards.

The charity has used the scheme to produce a detailed statistical assessment of cat health and medical state from within low income households derived from both basic consent/admittance forms and detailed vet exams under sedation. All the surgery has been carried out by Rufford Vet Group in Southport. As of June 2011 we have now neutered 311 cats and envisage finishing the first year of this project at the end of August 2011.

The charity has produced a follow up 'outcomes assessment' where participating households are contacted within 4 months of surgery to measure why neutering had not previously taken place and the benefits to the household that neutering has brought socially and economically. The charity will produce a statistical assessment from its figures in conjunction with John Moores University. We will be using the data collected to produce a more accurate assessment of cat ownership, veterinary access by owners, breeding and specific welfare issues within Liverpool 20 that can be related to income threshold and which in the future we can build upon as we focus our fieldwork into areas that need us most. We see this scheme as a pilot project which we could replicate in other deprived wards of Liverpool in the future. In particular we will be cross-referencing the figures from this project with all the data collated from our other neutering project.

This is a new project deliberately targeting a specific, concise area where analysis of the charity's records have proven absolute need and will be running alongside an existing project sponsored financially by Cats Protection that has been running for several years across the whole of Merseyside and that allows neutering for all households where breeding is taking place. In 2010 Cats Protection allowed us a £32,000 budget for this county wide scheme, and in 2011 gave us £25,000. By the end of June with this scheme we had neutered 602 cats for households.

Like many independent animal rescue charities, Freshfields does not have the funds to begin, let alone sustain, such vital projects as these. Without the financial support of our sponsors these projects could not happen and our work in the community would be a fraction of what it is today. The charity strongly believes that cat ownership should be open to all but to promote responsible ownership, to control over breeding and to minimise nuisance impact on neighbours, there needs to be proactive neutering schemes that can assist households lacking the means to secure a stable pet home.

 

 


Be a part of the SOLUTION…not the Problem!

Be a part of the SOLUTION…not the Problem!

Why Neuter Your Pet?

Neutering (spaying, castration, doctoring) is carried out for a variety of reasons in cats, dogs and smaller pets such as rabbits or guinea pigs. In all species neutering is permanent and obviously stops animals breeding. Neutered females will not reproduce and neutered males will not be able to impregnate un-neutered females should they manage to slip out. All neutering involves anesthesia but it is straightforward routine surgery on a healthy animal so the risks are negligible. It is worth remembering that there is both a stray dog and cat problem in this country and that charities like us are overrun with unwanted pets. Other rescue centres put these unwanted animals to sleep as there are not enough homes for them all. Freshfields has a strict non destruction policy – we deal with the situation and continually educate responsible owners by providing this information.

Various aspects in the species are discussed below:

Male Cats (Toms) – If not castrated, male cats are likely to be smelly and are more likely to fight, roam and spray urine in the house. Fighting can lead to abscesses and the spread of serious diseases such as FIV (‘Feline Aids’). Toms are usually neutered at 5 -6 months of age.

Female Cats (Queens) – Female cats can breed prolifically, up to 3 litters a year of possibly 8 – 10 kittens. Having them neutered stops this procedure. Queens are usually neutered at 5 – 6 months of age.

Male Dogs – Castration is a good idea not only because it stops them mating and adding to the unwanted dog problem but  it also helps with a selection of behavioural problems such as excessive barking, aggressiveness, hypersexual behaviour, roaming, inappropriate urination etc. There are also health benefits to castration including a decreased risk of prostate problems in later life and no risk of testicular cancer. Male dogs can be castrated at any age over 6 months.

Female Dogs (Bitches) – Spaying involves a total hysterectomy. It stops them coming into season every 6 months when there is the mess of bleeding as well as dogs hanging around and difficulties  when they are taken out for a walk. Neutering stops the risk of serious diseases in later life such as cervical cancer and an infected womb or pyometra, it also stops false pregnancies. If actioned before 4 years of age it also decreases the risk of mammary cancer.

It is a common myth that neutered bitches put on weight. It is true that neutered bitches are more prone to put on weight than unneutered ones but ONLY if they get too much to eat or too little exercise. In a healthy animal, food eaten and exercise are the two important things controlling weight and control of these will prevent weight increase. The other often talked about side effect of spaying is incontinence later in life. There is at present NO evidence that neutered bitches are more prone to this than unneutered ones. Bitches can be spayed at any time when they are not in season. Spaying before they ever have a season is commonly done; this makes the surgery easier and safer as the womb is smaller. The animals recover quicker and the cost is cheaper!

Rabbits – Neutering your rabbit has many benefits for you and your rabbit. Some rabbits can be very territorial and aggressive, neutering them usually eliminates these traits. Rabbits like the company of other rabbits so many people get them in pairs when they are young but don’t get them neutered. Same sex pairs often fight when they mature and mixed sexes will always breed. Unneutered males are at risk from testicular cancer and unneutered females are at a great risk from ovarian cancers which can effect up to 50% of female rabbits over 5 yrs old. Male rabbits can be neutered from 4-6mths old. Females can be neutered from 5-6 mths old. Over 24000 rabbits are abandoned yearly at rescues across the country.

If you require any other information regarding neutering or are in any way confused about any of the information in this leaflet please do not hesitate to ask a member of staff at Freshfields Animal Rescue Centre for more details …

… We will always be happy to help, giving sensible information about neutering helps us long term because if you understand the importance of neutering from the start we will inevitably see fewer and fewer unwanted animals – which is always our primary goal!


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